3D printed prosthetic

3D Printing Custom Prosthetics

in Interviews

Naked Prosthetics, a winner of our recent Tough Resin competition creates 3D printed finger prosthetics for amputees. Colin Macduff, the company’s founder, started working on finger prototypes after the amputation of his own finger. Fabricating the first device out of spare mountain bike parts in his garage, he applied for a patent and started the company in 2012.

Today, Naked Prosthetics is working with clinics, independent prosthetists, physicians, and surgeons to create custom prosthetics that are simple, elegant, and functional. Each biomechanical prosthetic finger (BPF) is completely customized, prototyped on the Formlabs Form 1+ desktop 3D printer. With the Form 1+, they are able to make on-the-fly design changes and experiment with new models on a daily basis. Naked Prosthetics has completely integrated the printer into their design process, making molds and testing the functional feasibility of new and existing products.

Naked Prosthetics mold Tough Resin
A Naked Prosthetics mold printed in Formlabs Tough Resin

Naked Prosthetics mold Tough Resin
A mold injected with platinum-cure silicone RTV to make extra-thick shims for patients with finger volume changes

Because of the complexity of making a prosthetic finger, the Form 1+ provides the most accurate, durable and cost-effective parts for the job. COO Jon Bengtsson says,

“The cost is quite low compared to producing parts in SLS and it allows us to print design changes and new models on demand.”

BPF device Naked Prosthetics 3D printed
The extra-thick shim, created using the Form 1+, in a BPF demonstration device

The company’s name comes from a desire to promote uncovered, naked prostheses and end the stigma of amputation. Naked Prosthetics employs advanced technology like stereolithography 3D printing on the Form 1+ to create an environment where innovative prosthetic devices are celebrated instead of hidden. Using the Form 1+, Naked Prosthetics’ fully-functional biomechanical fingers are helping amputees across the country get back to the active lifestyle they enjoy.

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